Practical Technology

for practical people.

February 12, 2019
by sjvn01
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Red Hat CloudForms 4.7 released

There’s an old, wise IT statement: “Never fix what’s broken.” Of course, there’s an equally true tech management thought, which goes: “You snooze, you lose.” So, trying to satisfy both the tortoises and hares of IT, Red Hat‘s newest version of its old-school CloudForms management tool comes ready to integrate with Red Hat’s DevOps program of choice: Ansible Tower.

Red Hat CloudForms 4.7 released More>

February 12, 2019
by sjvn01
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No, you can’t take open-source code back

Some people are still unclear about what it means or what happens once they’ve published their program under an open-source license. In the most recent example, mikeeusa, the author of an obscure game called GPC-Slots 2, claimed he was rescinding the program’s GPLv2 license from some people and “from anyone who adds a ‘Code of Conduct’ anywhere near my code (to ‘fight sexism’.).”

While this specific case doesn’t really matter — the text-based casino game hasn’t been updated in over a decade and appears to have no players — the issue of whether one can block users from using code once it’s been placed under the GPLv2 bothered enough people that it’s been one of the hottest stories on the Linux Kernel Mailing List (LKML) for over a week.

No, you can’t take open-source code back More>

February 7, 2019
by sjvn01
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Microsoft joins OpenChain open-source compliance group

OpenChain, I would argue, is the most important open-source project you’ve never heard of before. This Linux Foundationconsortium provides an industry standard for open-source supply chain license compliance. And now, Microsoft has joined the the OpenChain Project.

OpenChain’s important because the open-source software supply chain goes from companies that are little more than a single developer in his home office to multi-billion dollar businesses. Within it, there are tens of thousands of programs with a wide variety of open-source software licenses. So, how can companies trust and manage all the code’s legal requirements? The answer is with OpenChain.

Microsoft joins OpenChain open-source compliance group More>

February 7, 2019
by sjvn01
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Zero rating: Another way of poisoning net neutrality

Net neutrality was killed in the US in 2017. One lie Internet Service Providers (ISPs) and their allies used to promote this was that people would benefit by having ISPs make some sites and services’ data access free or cheaper.

This concept is known as zero rating. With a zero-rating plan, you won’t be charged for some data counting against your data cap when you use data for a particular service. For example, if you use  AT&T Wireless, you won’t get charged for watching DirecTV Now. When you subscribe to Virgin Mobile you’re not charged for data used with WhatsApp, Facebook Messenger, and Twitter.

Sounds good, doesn’t it? Think again.

Zero rating: Another way of poisoning net neutrality More>