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Net neutrality becomes the law of the land

The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) voted today to accept FCC chairman Tom Wheeler’s proposal that the Commission “use its Title II authority to implement and enforce open Internet protections.” Or, to put it in plain English, your ISP must provide equal broadband access to you or any site — Amazon, Netflix, etc. — without slowing down or speeding up sites for additional fees.

Net neutrality becomes the law of the land. More>

Lenovo website DNS record hijacked

This has not been Lenovo’s finest hour. First, security experts found that Lenovo was shipping Superfish adware, which turned out to have malware potential. Then, the company completely mishandled the news about it, simultaneously declaring it to be both a security concern and not one. Spoiler alert: Superfish was a major security foul-up. Now, the Lenovo website has been hacked.

Lenovo website DNS record hijacked. More>

RightScale: Where the cloud is going next

RightScale, an enterprise cloud management company, found in its 2015 State of the Cloud Survey that enterprises are increasingly implementing a hybrid cloud strategy that encompasses public and private clouds.

RightScale: Where the cloud is going next. More>

Chromebook Pixel, the Rolls-Royce of Chromebooks, is getting a refresh

Most people are happy with inexpensive Chromebooks. Some people, and I’m one of them, want top-of-the-line hardware and were willing to pay $1,449 for the Chromebook Pixel back in 2013. Now, Google will soon be releasing a Chromebook Pixel 2.

Chromebook Pixel, the Rolls-Royce of Chromebooks, is getting a refresh. More>

Linux kernel turns over release odometer to 4.0

Usually, when a software release moves to a new single digit release, it’s a big deal. When Linus Torvalds decided to shift the Linux kernel from 3.2x it was just to make developers happy.

As Torvalds, Linux’s founder, said on his Google+ account: “So, I made noises some time ago about how I don’t want another 2.6.39 where the numbers are big enough that you can’t really distinguish them. We’re slowly getting up there again, with 3.20 being imminent, and I’m once more close to running out of fingers and toes.”

Linux kernel turns over release odometer to 4.0. More>